Tea Tree Essential Oil
Tea Tree Essential Oil
Tea Tree Essential Oil
Tea Tree Essential Oil

Tea Tree Essential Oil

Regular price $ 8.00

(Melaleuca alternifolia)

GC/MS Key Constituents:
Terpinen-4-ol 43.99%
Terpinene <gamma> 20.19%
Terpinene <alpha> 10.31%
Terpinolene 3.37%
Terpineol <alpha-> 3.11%
1,8-Cineole 2.85%
Pinene <alpha> 2.33%
Cymene <para-> 1.83%

Plant origin: Austrailia

Extraction Method: Steam distilled from leaves (grown organically but not certified).

Selah oil blends that contain Tea Tree essential oil

ClarifyCloudburstCleanseRegenerateSelah Kids: Armor, Jr. Blend, Selah Kids: Ease, Jr. Blend

Roll-on is in a base of fractionated coconut oil (diluted at 5%).

Indications

Click here for a printable information sheet.

Using Tea Tree oil in the shower is cleansing; should be nonirritant, but check for irritation first (Schnaubelt, 125).

Cystitis (urinary tract infection) responds quickly to 1 to 3 drops of essential oil in a glass of water.... can be drunk repeatedly during the day. In the beginning of an acute condition, this can be done every 20 minutes and symptoms will diminish quickly. Then the frequency of consumption of the tea tree drink can be reduced. Treating cystitis with Tea Tree oil is highly effective. Nonetheless, if the cystitis is recurrent, diet or lifestyle changes may be required for a full resolution (Schnaubelt, 134).

Tea Tree is a generally sound essential oil for Herpes Virus (Schnaubelt, 141).

When treating hemorrhoids, aloe vera gel makes a good base for the essential oils, which can be self-administered. Spending 10 minutes in a sitz bath with essential oils (blended first in a little honey and hot water or an emulsifier [epsom salt]) is also useful, as is a compress... Phlebotonic essential oils which help to relieve hemorrhoids and varicose veins are: neroli, lemon, grapefruit, cypress, geranium, tea tree, cajuput, niaouli, spikenard and patchouli (Price, 242).

Candida in the mouth: 1 drop Tea Tree in honey and water - to be used as a mouth rinse 3-5 times a day. Tea Tree is perfect for treating mucous membrane infections of the mouth and gums, and for candida-related infections (Price, 282).

Abscess, acne, analgesic, animal bite, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antiviral, arthritis, athlete’s foot, bedsores, boil, bronchitis, burn, cold, cough, cradle cap, dandruff, decongestant, dental health, diaper rash, disinfectant, expectorant, flu, fungicidal, jock itch, immune stimulant, insecticide, insect repellent, intestinal parasites, laryngitis, oily hair, oily skin, rash, ringworm, sinus infection, skin tags, sunburn, thrush, wart, whooping cough, wounds (Althea Press, 413).

This oil is unusual in that it is active against all three categories of infectious organisms: bacteria, fungi and viruses. It is a very powerful immunostimulant, so when the body is threatened by any of these organisms, [Tea Tree] increases its ability to respond (Davis, 295).

It is one of the most important oils we have at our disposal for helping people who are H.I.V. (HIV) positive (Davis, 295).

Tea Tree and Lavender are common essential oils used to treat lice, ticks, and fleas. They can safely be used on children and animals (Buckle, 192).

Cold sores, and the blisters of chickenpox and shingles are effectively treated with tea tree. Dab it on at the first burning sensation that precedes the blisters (Davis, 295).

1 drop tea tree in the center of a wart every day and covered with a bandage is effective. It may take several weeks to see any result, but is effect in the long run (Davis 295).

Effective for ringworm and athlete’s foot, but more importantly is effective against Candida albicans [Candida and thrush] (Davis, 296).

Use Tea Tree in skin washes for acne. It is also good for the large, inflamed and often painful spots which some women tend to get around the nose and chin in the days preceding menstruation (Davis, 295-296).

Tea tree oil is a “first aid in a bottle” treatment for abscesses, acne, athlete’s foot, blisters, boils, minor burns and scalds, rashes, gingivitis, mouth ulcers, insect bites, lice, diaper rash, ringworm and infected wounds (Purchon, 112).

Tea tree helps to loosen and remove mucus. Because it has the ability to stimulate heavy sweating, it also reduces fever. In conjunction with its antiviral, antibacterial and anti fungal qualities, these capacities make it one of the most important oils to use in gargles, baths, massage blends, air sprays and diffusers to treat respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis, catarrh, colds, coughs, influenza, fevers, sinusitis, tonsillitis, tuberculosis, and whooping cough. Add it to air sprays and diffusers to recent infectious diseases from spreading (Purchon, 112).

Tea Tree is listed as one of the most useful essential oils to have in the home to be included in “The Basic Care Kit for Children” by Valerie Worwood. She recommends tea tree can be used to treat rashes, insect bites, nail fungus, ringworm, thrush, head lice, sore throats, boils, bronchial congestion, scabies, ulcers, wounds, cold sores, thrush, acne and bronchitis in children (Worwood, 34).

Candida in the mouth (Thrush) can be treated with 1 drop rosewood or 1 drop tea tree in honey and water to be used as a mouth rinse 3-5 times a day (Price, 282).

Fungal infections, viral and bacterial infections, colds, influenza, cold sores, warts, verrucas, inflammation, acne, burns, candida, shock, hysteria (Worwood, 407).

 

For more information on Tea Tree essential oil click here.

Applications

Topical: Apply topically diluted on areas where the skin is broken, including cuts, scrapes, burns, rashes and infection, or elsewhere as desired.

Ok for children 2+ with proper dilution.

Pregnancy and lactation safe with extra dilution.

Click here for the essential oils dilution chart.

Inhalation: Diffuse or inhale directly.

Internal:  Although the quality of Selah Oils is excellent, it is not advised to take essential oils internally unless under the guidance of a certified physician who is also certified in aromatherapy. We recommend getting internal dosing instructions from a licensed physician as some essential oils are not recommended for oral consumption. This is in no way a reflection on our oil quality, only a matter of safety and caution with respect to how concentrated essential oils are. When used within safe parameters, and under your physician's care, the quality of our essential oils is such that they can be used internally if deemed appropriate.

However, with that said, it is important to remember the extreme concentration of essential oils. "Using essential oils by rubbing them into the skin or via inhalation is in many cases more effective than oral delivery" (Schnaubelt 96).

All cautions listed for individual oils do not include those cautions from ingestion.

Cautions

All cautions listed for individual oils do not include those cautions from ingestion. It is not advised to take essential oils internally unless under the guidance of a licensed physician who is also certified in aromatherapy. 

Low risk of skin sensitization.  Old or oxidized oils should be avoided. (Tisserand, 441)

Tea Tree is known to antidote homeopathic remedies. Please use caution when using Homeopathy with oils.

Repeated use can result in contact sensitization.

If for any reason you get essential oils in your eyes, put carrier oil along the eyebrows above the eyes and on the cheekbones below the eyes.

Do not put essential oils inside the ear canal.

This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References

Higley, Connie & Alan. Reference Guide for Essential Oils (2012).

Tisserand, Robert. Essential Oil Safety, Second Ed. (2014).

Price, Shirley & Len. Aromatherapy for Health Professionals (2012), p. 242, 282.

Schnaubelt, PhD., Kurt. The Healing Intelligence of Essential Oils (2011), p. 125, 134, 141.

Tisserand, Robert. Essential Oil Safety, Second Ed. (2014).

Althea Press. Essential oils, Natural Remedies: The Complete A-Z Reference of Essential Oils for Health and Healing (2015).

Buckle, Jane. Clinical Aromatherapy Essential Oils in Practice (2003).

Worwood, Valerie. The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy (1991).

Worwood, Valerie. Aromatherapy for the Healthy Child (2000).

Davis, Patricia. Aromatherapy: An A-Z (2000).

Purchon, Nerys and Lora Cantele. The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential Oil Handbook for Everyday Wellness (2014).

Schnaubelt, Kurt Ph.D., Advanced Aromatherapy (1995), p. 96.

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